Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.

The Professional Development Program at SSA is a licensed State of Illinois provider of continuing education for social workers, clinical psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. License numbers: 159.000140; 168.000115; 268.000004. It is recommended that professionals review rules for their licensing board prior to registering for a workshop to ensure that the content meets their renewal requirements.


Social Work License: Preparation Review Course
Dates: Friday, September 15 & Saturday, September 16, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $260*
CEUs: 12
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: Sophia F. Dziegielewski

Registration Deadline: Monday, September 11, 2017

This comprehensive course covers test-taking strategies and relevant clinical content in order to prepare for the social worker or clinical social worker exams. Course materials are updated for DSM-5™ content and will cover topics such as: test-taking strategies; social work values and ethics (three hours to satisfy the State of Illinois ethics CE requirement for social workers); human growth and development issues; assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies; models and methods of social work practice; and clinical supervision.

This course consistently fills to capacity. Early registration is encouraged.

Course Objectives:

  • Overview of test construction and test-taking strategies
    • Identify how to break down questions and identify key words
    • Practice how to take social work practice information and address it in a standardized format)
  • Social work values and ethics
    • Recite and synthesize the dynamics of abuse and neglect
    • Review and interpret the NASW Code of Ethics
  • Human growth and development issues
    • Summarize major theoretical approaches to understanding human development with individuals, groups, and families
    • Sketch the theories and stages of normal psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and behavioral development in the life cycle of individuals, families and groups
  • Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies
    • Identify and interpret psychosocial history and collateral data, and how it relates in the social work practice setting
    • Assess client problems along with behavioral/psychosocial strengths and weaknesses
    • Identify diagnosis, assessment and practice intervention utilizing the DSM-5
    • Define the components of intervention strategies with individuals, groups, families and communities
    • Identify factors in the therapeutic relationship that facilitate building and retaining relationships
  • Models and methods of social work practice
    • Recognize the major theoretical approaches, models and methods of practice in the social work profession
    • Cite the different types of research designs utilized in social work practice
    • Translate the most common policies and procedures that govern service delivery
  • Clinical supervision
    • Restate the roles and functions related to professional supervision and educational expectations

This course satisfies the State of Illinois Ethics CE requirement for social workers.

*Tuition includes a review course manual with sample test questions and related materials, as well as the opportunity to contact the instructor with questions following the course.

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Motivation for Behavioral Change
Date: Friday, September 15, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park 

Instructor: Gary Gilles

Registration Deadline: Monday, September 11, 2017

Self-motivation, rather than external motivation, is at the heart of creativity, responsibility, healthy behavior, and lasting change. Yet how do we effectively motivate ourselves and others to learn, work, and practice responsible self-care?

This workshop will explore the issues of motivation and behavioral change in relation to clinical practice, supervision, management, and personal development. Participants will apply the principles of self-motivation to their personal lives and professional aspirations through use of case studies and experiential exercises.

This workshop will strengthen participants' ability to:

  • Examine the differences between internal self-motivation and external motivation
  • Learn the basic principles of self-efficacy theory
  • Integrate and apply the transtheoretical model of behavioral change along with principles from motivational interviewing
  • Discuss the importance of choice, ownership, autonomy, and a personal sense of competency as essential components of self-motivation
  • Explore the concept of self-motivation and strategies for overcoming barriers
  • Consider issues that undermine self-motivation and contribute to irresponsibility, victimization, and counterproductive learning

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Working with Challenging and High-Risk Adolescents: An Individualized Family Therapy Approach
Date: Friday, September 15, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park 

Instructor: Matthew D. Selekman 

Registration Deadline: Monday, September 11, 2017

Adolescents presenting with explosive and violent, highly oppositional, serious self-harming, heavy substance abuse, and delinquent behaviors can be a nightmare to work with even for the most seasoned of therapists. Often, these youth come from families characterized by emotional disconnection, invalidation, and other destructive interactions. The adolescents’ extreme and provocative behaviors attract helping professionals and concerned members from their social networks like a magnet. To further complicate matters, the involved larger systems professionals often are quite pessimistic, frustrated, and divided regarding their problem explanations and what the best treatment approach and level of care setting is for “high-risk” adolescents.

In this “hands-on,” practice-oriented workshop, participants will learn a collaborative strengths-based family therapy approach that carefully blends the best from family therapy science with clinical evidence-based practice wisdom. As a result of attending this workshop, participants will be able to put to immediate use the following:

  • Build strong working alliances with high-risk adolescents and their families
  • Use key family therapy research findings and clinical evidence-based practice wisdom regarding what works to inform your clinical decision-making
  • Use of self to create therapeutic breakthroughs with challenging adolescents and their families
  • Use therapeutic questions to elicit client expertise, established well-formed treatment goals, uncover secrets, and to co-create compelling future realities
  • Identify, recruit, and use Can-If Mapping with the family’s solution-determined collaborative team to rapidly co-construct high quality solutions
  • Co-design, select, and tailor-fit therapeutic interventions to empower the adolescents and their families to achieve their goals
  • Engage and foster cooperative partnerships with angry, highly pessimistic, laissez-faire, and mental health and substance abuse impaired parents
  • Use mindfulness practices to aid adolescents in emotional distress tolerance and to help prevent acting out episodes
  • Use effective family-social network relapse prevention tools and strategies
  • Resolve family-helping system knot dilemmas to unstick the treatment system and co-create possibilities
  • Use creative consultation team strategies with difficult and stuck cases
  • Use a one-person family therapy approach with adolescents when parental engagement attempts are unsuccessful or the parents are physically inaccessible

The workshop format will combine didactic presentation with extensive use of videotape examples and skill-building exercises.

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Beyond Show and Tell: Connecting with Funders for a Meaningful Site Visit
Date: Friday, October 6, 2017

Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75    
CEUs: 3
Location: Hyde Park 

Instructor: Frank Baiocchi

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, September 27, 2017

This workshop, led by a seasoned grant-maker who has also overseen several fund-raising efforts, will help nonprofit staff members understand how they can conduct a meaningful – and mutually rewarding – site visit with a potential funder.  During our time together, we will clarify definitions and roles for site visits; consider frameworks to improve relationship-building; and learn more about goal- and agenda-setting processes. We will explore the grant-maker’s mindset and how to work to align your organization’s priorities with their strategies. We will also engage in reflective and sharing activities to learn from each other’s expertise and experiences.  This interactive session will help debunk myths about site visits and provide tools and techniques to help reduce stress and provide support for nonprofit staff.

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Cultural Humility: An Integrated Framework for Serving Highly Vulnerable Populations
Date: Friday, October 6, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park 

Instructor: Gabriela Zapata-Alma 

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Highly vulnerable populations often present with chronic needs, complex trauma, high ambivalence and diminished opportunities for self-determination as well as self-efficacy. As such, it can be challenging for service providers to effectively engage these populations, and empower them to achieving greater stability and self-sufficiency. Often these populations are rejected by or discharged from social service settings due to the many barriers they encounter and present to accessing services. Additionally, many individuals and communities have developed mistrust of service systems due to experiences of both personal and historical trauma. Complex client needs coupled with significant barriers, requires service provision to be non-pathologizing, highly individualized and adaptable, while also engaging clients as experts in their own lives and building upon their existing strength and resilience.

Cultural humility provides a highly applicable and grounded framework for the flexible delivery of services to highly vulnerable populations across diverse cultures, communities, and needs. Many times we work with individuals and communities that are different from our own, which can work as a natural reminder for us as service providers to reflect on our differences and how these may impact our clinical process and service delivery. This workshop will explore cultural issues not only where we experience difference, but also in contexts where we share culture with our clients, as these situations can often present the greater risk of engaging assumptions and less effective practice.

This workshop helps participants examine and reflect on intersectionality, as well as how individual, group and system-level practices and environments support diverse and vulnerable populations, and ultimately how to improve on building safety for our clients to access and engage our services. Through  brief lecture, case presentation, small group activities, and self-assessment/reflection exercises, this workshop will touch on many special populations, including LGBTQ, Latinx, African American, and immigrant populations, as well as those whom have experienced intimate partner violence, homelessness, incarceration, trauma, severe mental/behavioral health issues, substance use, and other chronic medical issues such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key differences between cultural humility & cultural competence
  • Identify four basic components and values of cultural humility
  • Increase concrete skills and strategies in the application of cultural humility
  • Increase the practice of self-reflection, clinical supervision, and examining how one’s own culture(s) and experiences impact the assessment of and interventions with clients
  • Recognize how history can continue to shape present-day beliefs and behaviors
  • Become aware of how language contains implicit messaging that can marginalize others
  • Identify strategies to support diversity and client self-disclosure within individual, group, and agency service settings

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois Cultural Competence requirement for social workers.

AT CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO A WAIT LIST PLEASE EMAIL pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu


Essential Tools for Field Instruction
Date: Friday, October 6, 2017

Time: 9:00am-1:00pm
Tuition: $90*    
CEUs: 4
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: Bharathi Jayaram

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Field Education is central to the teaching of professional social work competencies and facilitating connections between theory and practice. The process of educating social work students in the field is complex and rewarding, and involves a unique set of skills and responsibilities.  

This workshop will provide clinical and social administration field instructors with practical strategies to:

  • Understand student learning patterns;
  • Design and evaluate substantive learning experiences and develop student competency;
  • Develop a healthy and productive teaching/learning alliance;
  • Design effective supervisory meetings;
  • Create a strengths-based focus, while challenging students to grow professionally; and
  • Optimize relationships between student, field instructor, and field liaison to support student learning.

The workshop is strongly recommended for field instructors who have been working with students in a supervisory capacity for less than three years or have not yet attended the training.   

*Current SSA Field Instructors may register free of charge provided they do so in advance of the registration deadline.

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Motivational Interviewing With Difficult-to-Engage Clients
Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: Gabriela Zapata Alma

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, October 4, 2017

This introductory session will orient attendees to the key principles and applications related to motivational interviewing. The training will include an overview of stages of change, as well as the principles, goals, and strategies of motivational interviewing. This experiential workshop will provide attendees an opportunity to practice skills and discuss approaches to working with clients who are not ready for more intensive treatment approaches. This workshop is appropriate for practitioners in substance abuse, mental health, health care, employee assistance programs, and senior services settings.

At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will:

  • Be able to state the goals and approaches used in motivational interviewing, including the four intentional processes:  engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning
  • Gain experience practicing basic motivational interviewing skills for helping clients resolve internal ambivalence about making change behaviors.  These skills include the use of Open ended questions, Affirmations, Reflections and Summaries (OARS) in conversations with clients
  • Be able to state why conveying an underlying spirit of collaboration, acceptance, compassion, and evocation is important in the practice of motivational interviewing with clients

Continuing education credits for psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists provided by SSA. Credits for CADC-licensed professionals applied through the Illinois Certification Board.

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Donald W. Winnicott and Contemporary Psychotherapy
Date: Friday, October 13, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: William Borden

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Donald W. Winnicott has emerged as one of the most creative thinkers in the psychoanalytic tradition, and his developmental theories and clinical perspectives continue to deepen our appreciation of essential concerns in contemporary psychotherapy.  This workshop provides an introduction to Winnicott’s thought and shows how his contributions enlarge our understanding of problems in living and concepts of therapeutic action in clinical practice.          

Winnicott elaborated complex and compelling accounts of human development and therapeutic action, over the course of his career as a pediatrician and psychoanalyst, but he did not codify his ideas in a systematic, integrative fashion.   He wrote in a personal idiom that is often characterized as poetic and evocative, what Andre Green calls “a richly alive experiencing,” and critics see him as elusive and iconoclastic in his refusal to define his fundamental concepts in a more technical language and rigorous manner.   Even the most experienced readers of Winnicott struggle in their attempts to grasp the defining features and central themes of his theoretical and clinical writings.  

By way of overview, the first part of the workshop examines the fundamental elements of his developmental psychology, identifying core concepts and orienting perspectives.  It presents basic developmental formulations, drawing on representative passages from Winnicott’s writings, and shows how his deep faith in our capacity for change, growth, and health informs ways of approaching the therapeutic situation.  We outline points of connection with recent developments in the science of mind and Buddhist psychology. 

The second section, focused on clinical practice, introduces concepts of therapeutic action based on Winnicott’s formulations of development and psychopathology.   We see how core concepts shape approaches to assessment, establishment of the holding environment, use of relational experience, and interpretive process over the course of psychotherapy.   

Discussion of clinical practice centers on vulnerable clients who present particular needs in psychosocial intervention, encompassing a range of diagnostic categories, and emphasizes flexible and pragmatic use of therapeutic strategies in view of the particular clinical situation—creative efforts to carry out what Winnicott called “experiments in adapting to need.”   


Confidentiality and Mandated Reporting in Clinical Practice
Date: Friday, October 27, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park 

Instructor: Helene Snyder

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Mental health professionals consider protecting confidentiality of information disclosed by patients to be one of their most important obligations. Maintaining the confidentiality of such information is required under the Illinois Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Confidentiality Act. In addition, most states have laws that either require or permit mental health professionals to disclose information about patients who may become violent.

In some cases it is evident that breaking confidentiality is required. Some circumstances, however, are unclear and pose ethical challenges for the professional(s) involved. Further, some mental health professionals question whether mandatory reporting laws discourage individuals from seeking professional treatment and whether individuals and families actually benefit from the interventions that may occur.

This workshop will address the obligations that are imposed on mental health professionals in Illinois regarding the reporting of suspected abuse and neglect of children and of eligible adults to designated legal authorities under the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act and the Adult Protective Services Act. Also, the proper procedures for record keeping and responding to subpoenas and requests for information will be discussed.

The instructor will provide documents on mandatory reporting laws and use lecture and class discussion to illustrate how practitioners can analyze some of the more complicated issues. Participants are encouraged to bring cases for discussion.

This workshop is intended to help participants:

  • Apply the definitions of abuse and neglect for children and eligible adults under Illinois law to determine when reports must be made to the appropriate legal authorities
  • Comply with reporting requirements for suspected abuse and neglect of children and eligible adults to the appropriate legal authorities 
  • Learn best practices regarding maintenance of therapist personal notes, confidentiality of mental health records and communications, and proper procedures for record keeping
  • Understand privileges to refuse disclosure of mental health records and responses to subpoenas for records or communications and to requests for information
  • Recognize potential consequences of disclosure without consent

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois ethics requirement for clinical psychologists and social workers.

AT CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO A WAIT LIST PLEASE EMAIL pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu


Negotiation and Decision-Making: Building Skills to Improve Your Outcomes
Date: Friday, October 27, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: Rebecca White 

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, October 18, 2017

This workshop will help participants become more effective negotiators and decision makers by introducing attendees to essential conceptual knowledge and by expanding their repertoire of relevant tactics and strategies. Participants will also practice skills, learn from interactive exercises, and benefit from feedback. This workshop identifies creative and flexible ways to achieve negotiation and decision-making goals, to protect interests while seeking mutually beneficial opportunities, and to identify the common psychological pitfalls that obstruct optimal agreements.

This workshop is designed to benefit anyone who would like to enhance their influence by improving their negotiation and decision-making skills, whether the context is internal (in their organizations) or external (with other organizations and vendors). Administrators in every functional area of responsibility, and in all organization types, will benefit by attending this program.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop a framework for assessing and effectively navigating negotiation situations
  • Learn to set and achieve effective negotiation goals
  • Identify the key characteristics of an good agreement
  • Acquire techniques for measuring interests, finding beneficial trades, and maximizing the outcome in a multiple-issue negotiation
  • Develop a framework for making sound decisions in group settings
  • Identify common psychological pitfalls that obstruct optimal agreements
  • Increase creativity and flexibility in solving problems
  • Develop plans to monitor, improve, and practice decision-making skills at the job

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Attachment-Focused Therapy: Clinical Strategies for Working with Children, Adolescents, and Their Families
Date: Friday, November 3, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Downtown Chicago

Instructor: Gary Gilles

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This workshop will help you to apply attachment principles in your work with children, adolescents and their families to improve treatment outcomes. You will learn practical strategies that can be used effectively in any clinical setting to help clients recover from early life wounds, build new attachments or repair ruptured relationships. You will review key attachment principles and explore the most common disruptions to healthy attachment. Most of the workshop will focus on practical application of strategies for working with parents, adolescents, children and the family system.

Learning outcomes:

  • Discuss the foundational concepts and essential research pertaining to attachment theory
  • Describe how stress, trauma and adverse experiences affect child development
  • Explain generational transmission of attachment style
  • Demonstrate accurate attunement to verbal and non-verbal communication in children and adolescents
  • Examine the pivotal role emotion has in forming attached relationships
  • Demonstrate affective and reflective skill development in children
  • Discuss rapport building approaches with various parental responses to therapeutic engagement
  • Apply attachment principles in family therapy setting

Bridging the Couple Chasm: Gottman Couples Therapy Level 1 Training - NEW DATE AND LOCATION
Dates: Friday, November 3 & Saturday, November 4, 2017

Time: 9:00am-5:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $450*
CEUs: 14
Location: Downtown Chicago 

Instructor: Michael McNulty 

Registration Deadline: Wednesday November 8, 2017

This two-day workshop is an intensive overview of The Gottman Method, an evidenced-based approach to couples therapy. Participants will learn to identify key points in couples’ interactions when interventions will be most effective; strategies to help partners shift from attack to connection; methods to help couples solve their own problems; skills to empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues; and tools to support couples’ friendship and intimacy.

Upon conclusion of this workshop, participants will learn:

  • How couples really sustain their marriages–in contrast to common myths and misconceptions.
  • How the quality of relationships affects the immune system, physical health and well-being.
  • How marital problems change over time, but never go away–even in happy couples.
  • Proven strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict
  • Skills that empower partners to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues
  • Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts
  • Techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse

CEUs will be provided by SSA. Certificates for completing Level I will be awarded through The Gottman Relationship Institute.

*Tuition includes the Gottman Level 1 manual.

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Obsessions and Reflections: Understanding and Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Date: Friday, November 3, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Downtown Chicago 

Instructor: Scott Granet 

Once considered to be a rare psychiatric illness, it is now believed that approximately three million people in the U.S. have obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although it is not as well-known as OCD, Body Dysmorphic Disorder is now linked with OCD in its new classification in the DSM-5.

The two disorders share many features such as tormenting obsessive thoughts and related compulsive behaviors, yet there are many differences as well. Although as many as 3-5 million people in this country are believed to have BDD, it remains an under-recognized and frequently misunderstood disorder. The primary purpose of this workshop is to familiarize attendees with the two diagnoses, to review cognitive and behavioral manifestations of each, and to thoroughly explore forms of treatment.

Goal: To familiarize workshop attendees with the process of both assessing for the presence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder, as well as the most effective forms of treatment for these two challenging, though treatable disorders.

At the end of this workshop the participant will be able to:

  • Identify likely causes, and know prevalence of OCD and BDD.
  • Assess for the presence of the two disorders by developing a thorough understanding of the DSM-V diagnostic criteria for each. In addition, recent changes to the DSM will also be identified in reference to each diagnosis
  • Explain reasons for BDD being reclassified in the DSM 5 under Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
  • Recognize considerations for differential diagnosis for each
  • Compare OCD and Body Dysmorphic Disorder, and have an understanding as to their similarities and differences
  • Identify comorbid disorders
  • Identify cognitive and behavioral manifestations of OCD and BDD
  • Utilize treatment strategies, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, and group therapy.  Participants will also become familiarized with medications most commonly used to treat these disorders
  • Refer to support resources available for patients and families

AT CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO A WAITING LIST EMAIL: pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu


Clinical Supervision: Tending the Professional Self
Date: Friday, November 10, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Evanston

Instructor: Jill R. Gardner

Registration Deadline: Wednesday November 1, 2017

Professionals often advance to supervisory roles with little or no formal training in ways to conceptualize the supervisory process. In this workshop, we will approach clinical supervision as an activity focusing on the development, consolidation, and maintenance of the supervisee’s professional self. Emphasis will be on supervision as a relationship and on the importance of focusing on the inner experience of the trainee. Concepts from self psychology and other theoretical perspectives will be used to describe models of supervision. Through a combination of lecture and large-group and small-group discussion, we will address how to do the following: manage supervisees’ anxiety and self-esteem, deal with defensiveness, balance administrative and clinical demands, integrate empathy with limit setting, and engage in effective feedback. Participants will be encouraged to share and examine their current supervisory experiences in the context of the conceptual frameworks presented.

This workshop will emphasize work with students and recent graduates; however, participants will find much of the conceptual material applicable to supervisory relationships with employees as well. The workshop is appropriate for both new and experienced supervisors.

This workshop is designed to help supervisors be able to:

  • Create a collaborative supervisory alliance and structure
  • Reduce anxiety and defensiveness in the supervisee
  • Identify internal processes that lead to problematic clinical interventions
  • Provide effective feedback
  • Balance administrative and clinical demands
  • Set appropriate limits while maintaining a positive supervisory relationship

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois Supervision requirement for professional counselors.

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Leading with Compassion and Creativity: Communication Skills for Fostering Emotional Safety and Personal Growth in the Workplace
Date: Friday, November 10, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Evanston

Instructor: Nikki Lively

AT CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO A WAIT LIST PLEASE EMAIL pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Why do people do what they do?  What truly motivates us?  What inspires us?  These are common questions of any organization and its leaders.  The myth that human beings are “rational” has been debunked in the last several decades of behavioral and sociological research, but the good news is that human behavior is predictably irrational and can be understood. 

This workshop will explore the latest research on the sociology of human behavior and motivation, the neurobiology of compassion and connection, and the psychology of creativity and growth and translate these into practical strategies for effectively managing volunteers and staff. We will identify sources of inspiration to make organizational change sustainable, and use experiential activities to begin to practice new ways of intentionally communicating with warmth, and compassionately understanding our supervisees, co-workers and ourselves.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the importance of compassion and emotional safety in the workplace
  • Participants will identify barriers to self-compassion and practice strategies for cultivating self and other compassion
  • Participants will explore and practice skills to enhance warmth in communication
  • Participants will deepen their understanding of their strengths and areas of growth in their supervisory/leadership styles
  • Participants will develop strategies for creative leadership and be able to describe the connection between emotional safety and creativity

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Man to Man: Male Therapists/Male Clients
Date: Friday, November 10, 2017

Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75
CEUs: 3
Location: Evanston

Instructor: Rick Volden

Registration Deadline: Wednesday November 1, 2017

Fewer men than women seek psychotherapy, and fewer men are pursuing careers as therapists.  How do we understand these facts?  What cultural influences might account for the consistently lower utilization of therapy by men, and what might account for the dramatic decrease in the number of men enrolling in training programs for counseling and psychotherapy?  For those men who do pursue therapy, how does their sex-role socialization shape their needs, expectations, and experience in treatment?  And for men who work as therapists, how does their gender affect how they work and how they feel in their role as a caregiver or helper? 

This workshop will explore these questions through the lens of sex-role socialization and stereotyping, and will also examine the transference and countertransference issues that can arise for men in therapy and for male therapists, respectively.  Special attention will be devoted to the male/male treatment dyad, wherein the gender-based influences can fuel a rich and unique dynamic.  Themes of intimacy, dependency, competition, aggression, yearning, adequacy/inadequacy, twinship, sexuality, power, and friendship are among the topics that might be explored within this context.  Sexual orientation as a variable in these dynamics will be addressed, and single-gender group therapy for men will also be discussed as a potentially potent treatment modality. 

Time will be allocated for workshop participants to share their own experiences and perspectives.  What drew them to their profession?  How do they experience their gender as a factor in their professional identity and/or how they practice?  How does their work with male clients feel different, if it does, from their work with women?  What gets provoked?  What unique needs get met (for the therapist and for the client) if there is a male/male treatment dyad?  What function did the workshop serve for participants?  What might they need or want going forward to support their work with men?  Ideally, this workshop will provide an opportunity for both education and kinship for therapists interested in gaining a better understanding of the role that gender plays in the experience of therapy done “man to man.”

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Integrating Psychotherapy and Spirituality: A Focus on Ethics and Cultural Competence
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Oak Brook

Instructor: Mark Sanders

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Two-thirds of Americans surveyed say they would prefer to work with a therapist who has a spiritual foundation. This interactive, skill-building workshop focuses on strategies to integrate spirituality and psychotherapy.  The workshop will address the differences between religion and spirituality, issues of diversity in spirituality, and ethical principles that can guide the use of spirituality in addictions and psychotherapy.

A partial list of topics includes: the differences between religion and spirituality; integrating religion and spirituality with traditional counseling approaches; ethics and spirituality; conducting a spiritual assessment; issues of diversity in spirituality; understanding the fuels of religious addiction—abandonment, toxic shame, and perfectionism; and addressing religious addiction in psychotherapy.

By the end of this workshop, participants will:

  • Understand the differences between religion and spirituality
  • Learn strategies for integrating spirituality into traditional counseling
  • Know how to conduct a spiritual assessment
  • Recognize ethical principles that can guide the use of spirituality in addictions and psychotherapy
  • Describe three fuels of religious addiction and strategies for addressing religious addiction in psychotherapy

This workshop satisfies the state of Illinois cultural competence requirement for social workers, and the ethics requirement for clinical psychologists and social workers.

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Safe and Effective Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: Oak Brook 

Instructor: Janna Henning

Registration Deadline: Wednesday November 8, 2017

Responses to traumatic life events are among the most common issues our clients may bring to therapy. Symptom profiles may differ, depending on whether the trauma response follows a single event occurring during adulthood or chronic interpersonal violence that interfered with normal development. Although trauma-related clinical issues frequently arise in any type of clinical setting, recent changes in post-traumatic stress theory and diagnosis and limited formal training in this area may leave therapists feeling insufficiently prepared to work effectively with the unique and complex nature of each client’s trauma-related symptoms, strengths, and resources.

This workshop will focus on increasing knowledge and awareness of key issues and approaches in the traumatic stress field, and help practitioners develop new, practical, evidence-based, and creative skills to help identify clients’ trauma-related needs and assist them to adjust and thrive. The instructor will utilize interactive discussions, case studies, media and Internet resource guides, and demonstration of clinical techniques. Participants will gain the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to work confidently and effectively withsingle-event and complex traumatic stress in their work with clients.

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between common post-traumatic responses to single-event trauma exposure in adulthood (Type I trauma) vs. chronic interpersonal violence exposure in childhood (Type II/complex trauma), and evaluate diagnostic alternatives
  • Identify and select safe and effective treatment approaches for both Type I and Type II trauma reactions in adults
  • Describe basic approaches for responding after mass trauma in communities or schools.

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Mindfulness and its Application in the Practice and Personal Experience of Mental Health Service Providers
Date: Friday, December 8, 2017

Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: Hyde Park

Instructor: Paul Holmes

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Mindfulness meditation is one of the oldest practices known, having been used for centuries in various forms and in various religious traditions. Over the last decade, this technique has become a major focus of clinical research and practice. There are a variety of definitions of mindfulness and the function it serves in clinical settings. Nonetheless, as more data demonstrates that change and control of thoughts and emotions exacerbates distress, clinicians are shifting their focus to mindfulness and acceptance as a viable stance toward private experience.

Although the current literature is replete with discussion of mindfulness either as a strategy, a process, or an outcome, in this workshop it will be presented in terms of all three. To that end, participants will be introduced to contemporary research in the function of verbal behavior, particularly relational frame theory. This will serve to establish a context for understanding mindfulness as a method of disciplining the capacity for attending to and experiencing the benefits of living in the present. In addition to lecture and discussion on this topic, participants will be introduced to the practice of mindfulness meditation.

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Kyle Bullock, AM '16

"Without scholarship support, I would not have been able to attend the University of Chicago. I promise, one day, to be in a position so I can help more students fulfill their dreams."