PDP Spring 2018 Programs

The Professional Development Program at SSA is a licensed State of Illinois provider of continuing education for social workers, clinical psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors. License numbers: 159.000140; 168.000115; 268.000004. It is recommended that professionals review rules for their licensing board prior to registering for a workshop to ensure that the content meets their renewal requirements.

Sandtray Therapy and Other Play Therapy Techniques
Date: Friday, March 2, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: 933 Skokie Boulevard, Northbrook

Instructor: Sophia Ansari

THIS WORKSHOP HAS REACHED CAPACITY AND REGISTRATION IS CLOSED

Sandtray play therapy is a highly therapeutic and multidimensional form of therapy which can bring about deep introspection and facilitate change. In this workshop, you will learn about the basic theory and practice of sandtray play therapy and how to integrate it into your work with children, adolescents and adults. Through experiential learning, you will have the opportunity to build a sandtray and learn the skills to facilitate the sandtray process for others.

Participants will leave with a deeper understanding and appreciation for the power of sandtray play therapy, as well as discover other play therapy techniques that can be incorporated into any setting, with any clientele.

This program has been approved for 6 contact hours by the Association for Play Therapy (Approved Provider 15-422)

Skills-Based Interventions for Survivors of Interpersonal and Complex Trauma
Date: Friday, March 2, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6
Location: 933 Skokie Boulevard, Northbrook

Instructor: Kathryn Kelly Carroll

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Survivors of interpersonal and complex traumas often present to treatment with difficulty managing the stressors that come with daily life.  While there are multiple effective evidenced-based trauma-focused treatments available to address PTSD, survivors often express a preference to address these day-to-day difficulties before engaging in a trauma-focused treatment, or struggle with skills deficits even after completing trauma-focused treatment.  Judith Herman’s 3-stage model of trauma recovery highlights the importance of safety-building and stabilization before engaging in trauma focused modalities.  This full day workshop will provide a rationale and overview of effective and evidenced-based skills-focused treatments for survivors of interpersonal and complex traumas.  Attendees will learn and practice implementing specific interventions with clients, and take home a conceptualization for integrating skills-based treatment into their current clinical practice with trauma survivors.

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Embracing Our Clients' Healthy Strivings: A View From Self Psychology
Date: Friday, March 9, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Denise Davis

Registration Deadline: Wednesday February 28, 2018

“Blow on the ember”, was the advice of self psychologist Marian Tolpin, a protégé of Heinz Kohut, the father of self psychology. This captures the understanding that despite our clients’ pain or behavioral symptoms, a healthy spark is embedded in their suffering and in even the most maladaptive behaviors. Self psychology informs clinicians in their efforts to seek out clients’ healthy strivings and facilitate transformation. Participants will learn the basics of contemporary self psychological theory, including the influences of intersubjectivity theory and attachment theory on self psychology. The presenter will bring the theory to life through her use of a wide variety of clinical examples. 

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Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Logotherapy to Help Clients Change
Date: Friday, March 9, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Mark Sanders

Registration Deadline: Wednesday February 28, 2018

A primary goal of motivational interviewing with clients is to increase the client’s internal motivation to change. There are some clients who have such a high degree of hopelessness and apathy and are so devoid of goals, that motivational interviewing may be ineffective in motivating them to change. Some of these clients don’t hit bottom—they seem to “live on the bottom.” In this interactive, skill-building workshop, participants will be introduced to an approach that combines logo therapy with motivational interviewing to help clients change.

Logotherapy was created by the renowned psychiatrist Victor Frankl, who was a concentration camp survivor. Its purpose is to increase clients’ hope and to help them find a sense of purpose in their suffering. Participants will leave with activities that integrate principles of motivational interviewing and logo therapy.

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Mindfulness in Clinical Practice
Date: Friday, March 16, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 3500 Midwest Road, Oak Brook

Instructor: Brit Holmberg

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 7, 2018

The term mindfulness is everywhere these days – from the cover of Time Magazine to MBA courses to mental health settings.  Research shows that mindfulness practice can support therapeutic progress and benefit overall clinician well-being. In this interactive workshop, participants will have multiple opportunities to broaden their capacity to incorporate mindfulness into both their personal and professional lives.  It is designed to function as part retreat, part didactic forum in order to maximize the experimental component of mindfulness practice. Come to learn and be restored.

Key areas to be covered include:

  • The 7 core principles of mindfulness
  • Current research on the value of mindfulness for recovery and symptom management
  • Resources for deepening group discussions and practice
  • Case examples of the power of mindfulness in clinical settings
  • Suggestions for how to use smart phone apps to support mindfulness practice 

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Psychotherapy with Black Women
Date: Friday, March 16, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 3500 Midwest Road, Oak Brook

Instructors: Donna Baptiste & Adia Gooden

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Black women in the United States are a unique population and it is important to understand their personal, social, ecological, and historical experiences to effectively treat them. This workshop will explore the common and unique strengths, challenges and dynamics that Black women face in the U.S and the clinical implications of such experiences.  Emphasis will be on forging strong therapeutic alliances with black female clients of varying ages and backgrounds, and working collaboratively with them around their social identities and behavioral health concerns. We will examine constraints to building working alliances with Black women when therapists are of different racial/ethnic and gender backgrounds. We will use case examples, role playing and other experiential learning techniques for quick grasp of clinical knowledge and skills that can be integrated into individual, couple and family therapy with Black women.  The overall aim of the workshop is to expand multicultural competence and proficiency in clinicians and in clinical settings.  

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois Cultural Competence requirement for social workers.

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Bridging the Couple Chasm: Gottman Couples Therapy Level I Training
Dates: Friday, April 13 & Saturday, April 14, 2018
Time: 9:00am-5:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $450*
CEUs: 14
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Michael McNulty

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 4, 2018

This two-day workshop is an intensive overview of The Gottman Method, an evidenced-based approach to couples therapy. Participants will learn to identify key points in couples’ interactions when interventions will be most effective; strategies to help partners shift from attack to connection; methods to help couples solve their own problems; skills to empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues; and tools to support couples’ friendship and intimacy.

Upon conclusion of this workshop, participants will learn:

  • How couples really sustain their marriages–in contrast to common myths and misconceptions.
  • How the quality of relationships affects the immune system, physical health and well-being.
  • How marital problems change over time, but never go away–even in happy couples.
  • Proven strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict
  • Skills that empower partners to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues
  • Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts
  • Techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse

CEUs will be provided by SSA. Certificates for completing Level I will be awarded through The Gottman Relationship Institute.

*Tuition includes a 300 page manual

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Clinical Supervision: Tending the Professional Self
Date: Friday, April 13, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Jill R. Gardner

THIS WORKSHOP HAS REACHED CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO THE WAITLIST VISIT HERE 

Professionals often advance to supervisory roles with little or no formal training in ways to conceptualize the supervisory process. In this workshop, we will approach clinical supervision as an activity focusing on the development, consolidation, and maintenance of the supervisee’s professional self. Emphasis will be on supervision as a relationship and on the importance of focusing on the inner experience of the trainee. Concepts from self psychology and other theoretical perspectives will be used to describe models of supervision. Through a combination of lecture and large-group and small-group discussion, we will address how to do the following: manage supervisees’ anxiety and self-esteem, deal with defensiveness, balance administrative and clinical demands, integrate empathy with limit setting, and engage in effective feedback. Participants will be encouraged to share and examine their current supervisory experiences in the context of the conceptual frameworks presented.

This workshop will emphasize work with students and recent graduates; however, participants will find much of the conceptual material applicable to supervisory relationships with employees as well. The workshop is appropriate for both new and experienced supervisors.

This workshop is designed to help supervisors be able to:

• Create a collaborative supervisory alliance and structure.

• Reduce anxiety and defensiveness in the supervisee.

• Identify internal processes that lead to problematic clinical interventions.

• Provide effective feedback.

• Balance administrative and clinical demands.

• Set appropriate limits while maintaining a positive supervisory relationship. 

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois clinical supervision training requirement for clinical professional counselors.

Social Work License: Preparation Review Course
Dates: Friday, April 13 & Saturday, April 14, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $260*
CEUs: 12
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Sophia F. Dziegielewski

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 4, 2018

This comprehensive course covers test-taking strategies and relevant clinical content in order to prepare for the social worker or clinical social worker exams. Course materials are updated for new DSM-5™ content and will cover topics such as: test-taking strategies; social work values and ethics (three hours to satisfy the State of Illinois ethics CE requirement for social workers); human growth and development issues; assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies; models and methods of social work practice; and clinical supervision.

This course consistently fills to capacity. Early registration is encouraged.

This review course will cover: 

Overview of test construction and test-taking strategies

    • Identify how to break down questions and identify key words
    • Practice how to take social work practice information and address it in a standardized format)

Social work values and ethics

    • Recite and synthesize the dynamics of abuse and neglect
    • Review and interpret the NASW Code of Ethics

Human growth and development issues

    • Summarize major theoretical approaches to understanding human development with individuals, groups, and families
    • Sketch the theories and stages of normal psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and behavioral development in the life cycle of individuals, families and groups

Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies

    • Identify and interpret psychosocial history and collateral data, and how it relates in the social work practice setting
    • Assess client problems along with behavioral/psychosocial strengths and weaknesses
    • Identify diagnosis, assessment and practice intervention utilizing the DSM-5
    • Define the components of intervention strategies with individuals, groups, families and communities
    • Identify factors in the therapeutic relationship that facilitate building and retaining relationships

Models and methods of social work practice

    • Recognize the major theoretical approaches, models and methods of practice in the social work profession
    • Cite the different types of research designs utilized in social work practice
    • Translate the most common policies and procedures that govern service delivery

Clinical supervision

    • Restate the roles and functions related to professional supervision and educational expectations

*Tuition includes a review course manual with sample test questions and related materials, as well as the opportunity to contact the instructor with questions following the course.

This course satisfies the State of Illinois Ethics CE requirement for social workers.

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Mandated Reporting in Clinical Practice
Date: Friday, April 20, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 10 E Grand Avenue, Chicago

Instructor: Helene Snyder

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Mental health professionals consider protecting confidentiality of information disclosed by patients to be one of their most important obligations. Maintaining the confidentiality of such information is required under the Illinois Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Confidentiality Act. Yet, clinicians, supervisors, and program administrators may encounter situations when they must determine whether this commitment should be overridden. In addition, most states have laws that either require or permit mental health professionals to disclose information about patients who may become violent. In some cases it is evident that breaking confidentiality is required. Some circumstances, however, are unclear and pose ethical challenges for the professional(s) involved. Further, some mental health professionals question whether mandatory reporting laws discourage individuals from seeking professional treatment and whether individuals and families actually benefit from the interventions that may occur.

This workshop will address the obligations that are imposed on mental health professionals in Illinois regarding the reporting of suspected abuse and neglect of children and of eligible adults to designated legal authorities under the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act and the Adult Protective Services Act. 

The instructor will provide documents on mandatory reporting laws and use lecture and class discussion to illustrate how practitioners can analyze some of the more complicated issues. Participants are encouraged to bring cases for discussion.

This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois ethics requirement for licensed social workers and clinical psychologists.

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Making Meetings Effective
Date: Friday, April 20, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 10 E Grand Avenue, Chicago

Instructor: Arnie Aronoff

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Have you led meetings that went nowhere?  Have you participated in meetings that seem like a waste of time?  Do you feel that the only outcome of a meeting is another meeting?

If you resonate with any of the issues raised by these questions, then this experiential workshop will help you. We will approach making meetings effective from a number of perspectives, including those of the meeting leader, the head of a department (who may or may not be the same as the meeting leader), the interested participant, the uninterested participant, the project manager, and the outside visitor (such as an expert invited to the meeting). The instructor will use experiential activities, brief lectures, and simulations to facilitate learning. 

Topics include:

  • Creating an effective agenda and setting meeting ground rules;
  • Keeping meeting discussion focused and on-topic;
  • Separating idea generation from idea evaluation;
  • Making decisions;
  • Assigning work between meetings, as well as accountabilities and target dates for that work;
  • Dealing with interpersonal dynamics that impair progress, such as domineering or withdrawn participants; and
  • Using formal meeting procedures such as Robert's Rules or modified versions of Robert’s Rules

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Using Data Visualization to Boost Your Organization's Fundraising
Date: Friday, May 11, 2018
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75    
CEUs: 3
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Amelia Kohm

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Almost every nonprofit has two “secret” weapons, so secret that even those on staff might not be fully aware of them. The first is the data that they have packed away in databases and spreadsheets, often collecting virtual dust on their servers.  The second is the visual faculties of donors and staff members. While most of us glaze over at the sight of a spreadsheet, humans are wired to process visual information at lightning speed. By showing data in engaging visual formats, we can conquer the primary challenges of fundraising, including:

  • Acquiring new donors
  • Retaining donors
  • Diversifying funding sources
  • Increasing demand for programs/services
  • Staffing constraints (such as time for and expertise in fundraising)
  • Promoting effectiveness
  • Distinguishing work from competitors

Through presentation of real-world examples of effective visualization, discussion, and hands-on data visualizing activities, participants will learn how to choose the right type of visualizations to address each of these challenges, how to design a visualization to be clear and engaging, and how to use free software to produce polished static and interactive visualizations.

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Managing the Opioid Crisis: Substance Abuse Treatment in the FQHC
Date: Friday, May 18, 2018
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75    
CEUs: 3
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Amanda Brooks

Registration Deadline Extended: Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Integrating mental health services into primary care clinics improves patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and patient outcomes, and decreases health care costs. Placing mental health and substance abuse (MH/SA) professionals on the front lines of primary care alongside physicians to deliver consultative MH/SA healthcare allows for a shift toward a population-based approach, and thus increases access to more individuals. 

However, lack of timely access to addiction professionals, specifically DATA Waiver physicians who can prescribe buprenorphine, significantly impacts engagement in addiction treatment. 

From 2007-2012, the state of Illinois decreased its treatment capacity for alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) treatment by 52%, making it the number one treatment capacity decline in the United States. In 2004, more than 1.2 million Illinois residents suffered from an AODA disorder, and approximately 266,000 individuals were managing co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. With the expansion of access to affordable healthcare that includes substance abuse treatment as an essential health benefit, community health centers are faced with the daunting responsibility of expanding comprehensive medical and behavioral health services to include the treatment of AODA disorders.  The complicated risk factors associated with the opiate dependent patient create both organizational and provider challenges to offering expanded access to care. 

Through this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the history of events resulting in the culmination of the opioid epidemic. They will also better understand the correlations between behavioral health and substance use, and the integration of substance abuse treatment into the primary care setting. The workshop will outline the essential components of State and Federal regulations needed to navigate implementation and integration of opioid treatment into primary care. It will also explore ways to enhance integrated services with the inclusion of medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence in order to provide better care for vulnerable populations. Finally, the presenter will review best practices in integrating substance abuse services into the established behavioral health and primary care model.

Credits for CADC-licensed professionals applied through the Illinois Certification Board. Program # 13875

Category:   Counselor I or II, Preventionist I or II, CARS I or II, MISA I or II or III, PCGC II, CCJP II, CAAP I, CRSS I or II, RDDP, MAATP I or II, NCRS II, CFPP II, CVSS II

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Working with Emotion and Attachment: A Brief Overview of Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy
Date: Friday, May 18, 2018
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150    
CEUs: 6
Location: 1818 Maple Ave, Evanston

Instructor: Nikki Lively

THIS WORKSHOP HAS REACHED CAPACITY. TO BE ADDED TO A WAITLIST EMAIL pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu 

Rooted in attachment therapy, Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy (EFT) is an experiential approach that utilizes a systemic and structured model of change to help couples lower conflict and create secure engagement. It is based on clear, explicit conceptualizations of marital distress and adult love and the change process through treatment. These conceptualizations are supported by a substantial and growing body of empirical research on both the outcome and process of treatment.  The EFT therapist first helps partners shift their conflict cycle, then access and express the powerful, often vulnerable, emotion states that have helped maintain that cycle. The treatment strategies and process have been clearly mapped out in three key change events occurring across three stages. EFT has been applied to a wide variety of couple types with many different problems, including affairs, mood disorders, trauma, and chronic illness. EFT is also used in family therapy.

This introductory seminar outlines the theory, interventions and treatment process to help participants get a flavor of this highly researched and well-respected treatment model. In addition to didactic material, there will be a video example for demonstration and time for discussion. 


*NEW*

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)
Dates: Monday, June 11 - Friday, June 15
Times: 9:00am-12:00pm each day
Tuition: $375 
CEUs: 15
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Paul Holmes

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Most therapies assume that individuals seeking treatment have an identified problem and are willing to focus their efforts toward some resolution of it over time. Further, these therapies assume that clients seeking psychotherapy services have the requisite skills necessary to work collaboratively and participate constructively with their therapist. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral therapy shown to be effective with multi-problem persons who lack the skills to engage consistently in therapies operating from these basic assumptions.

Originally developed to address the unique concerns of persons with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, DBT is now considered helpful for persons engaged in a self-perpetuating struggle where efforts to control emotional pain only result in increased emotional distress. It is a comprehensive and intensive therapy involving four clinical activities: skills training, individual psychotherapy, telephone consultation, and group consultation.

In this intensive workshop, the facilitator will use various strategies including lectures, role-play, and question-and-answer sessions to familiarize participants to the various tenets of DBT from a contextual behavior perspective.

This workshop is designed to assist participants:

1)      Describe the theoretical assumptions and basic principles of DBT.
2)      Summarize the dialectics of acceptance and change.
3)      Explain the four components of DBT.

  1. Core Mindfulness
  2. Distress Management
  3. Emotion Regulation
  4. Interpersonal Effectiveness

4)      Summarize skills used to conduct skills training group.
5)      Summarize skills and principles for conducting a DBT individual session.
6)      Summarize the function and implementation of telephone consultation.
7)      Describe the function and benefits of the consultation group.
8)      Observe demonstrations of the principles and practice of DBT.
9)      Practice the use of the diary card and mindfulness exercises.

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Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.