Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.

Social Work License: Preparation Review Course
Dates: Friday, June 16 & Saturday, June 17, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (both days)
Tuition: $260*
CEUs: 12
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Sophia F. Dziegielewski

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 7, 2017

This comprehensive course covers test-taking strategies and relevant clinical content in order to prepare for the social worker or clinical social worker exams. Course materials and content will cover topics such as: social work values and ethics (three hours to satisfy the state of Illinois ethics requirement for social workers); human growth and development issues; assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies utilizing the DSM-5™; models and methods of social work practice; and clinical supervision.

This course consistently fills to capacity. Early registration is encouraged.

*Tuition includes review course manual with sample test questions and related materials, as well as the opportunity to contact the instructor with questions following the course.

Course Objectives:

  • Overview of test construction and test-taking strategies
    • Identify how to break down questions and identify key words
    • Practice how to take social work practice information and address it in a standardized format)
  • Social work values and ethics
    • Recite and synthesize the dynamics of abuse and neglect
    • Review and interpret the NASW Code of Ethics
  • Human growth and development issues
    • Summarize major theoretical approaches to understanding human development with individuals, groups, and families
    • Sketch the theories and stages of normal psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and behavioral development in the life cycle of individuals, families and groups
  • Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies
    • Identify and interpret psychosocial history and collateral data, and how it relates in the social work practice setting
    • Assess client problems along with behavioral/psychosocial strengths and weaknesses
    • Identify diagnosis, assessment and practice intervention utilizing the DSM-5
    • Define the components of intervention strategies with individuals, groups, families and communities
    • Identify factors in the therapeutic relationship that facilitate building and retaining relationships
  • Models and methods of social work practice
    • Recognize the major theoretical approaches, models and methods of practice in the social work profession
    • Cite the different types of research designs utilized in social work practice
    • Translate the most common policies and procedures that govern service delivery
  • Clinical supervision
    • Restate the roles and functions related to professional supervision and educational expectations

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Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)
Dates: Monday, June 19 - Friday, June 23, 2017
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm (each day)
Tuition: $360  
CEUs: 15
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Paul Holmes

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Most therapies assume that individuals seeking treatment have an identified problem and are willing to focus their efforts toward some resolution of it over time. Further, these therapies assume that clients seeking psychotherapy services have the requisite skills necessary to work collaboratively and participate constructively with their therapist. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral therapy shown to be effective with multi-problem persons who lack the skills to engage consistently in therapies operating from these basic assumptions.

Originally developed to address the unique concerns of persons with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, DBT is now considered helpful for persons engaged in a self-perpetuating struggle where efforts to control emotional pain only result in increased emotional distress. It is a comprehensive and intensive therapy involving four clinical activities: skills training, individual psychotherapy, telephone consultation, and group consultation. 

In this intensive workshop, the facilitator will use various strategies including lectures, role-play, and question-and-answer sessions to familiarize participants to the various tenets of DBT from a contextual behavior perspective.

This workshop is designed to assist participants:

1)      Describe the theoretical assumptions and basic principles of DBT.

2)      Summarize the dialectics of acceptance and change.

3)      Explain the four components of DBT.

  1. Core Mindfulness
  2. Distress Management
  3. Emotion Regulation
  4. Interpersonal Effectiveness

4)      Summarize skills used to conduct skills training group.

5)      Summarize skills and principles for conducting a DBT individual session.

6)      Summarize the function and implementation of telephone consultation.

7)      Describe the function and benefits of the consultation group.

8)      Observe demonstrations of the principles and practice of DBT.

9)      Practice the use of the diary card and mindfulness exercises.

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Program Evaluation: Getting What You Need
Date:   Tuesday, June 20, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Debra A. Hass

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

This workshop will examine evaluation from the perspective of organization staff and board members. Participants will practice creating theories of change and choosing indicators that reflect the intended impact of their programs, respond to stakeholder concerns, and, most importantly, provide opportunities to learn from and use evaluation for program improvement. 

Participants will learn to:

  • Identify the appropriate type and intensity of evaluation for a given program
  • Create a theory of change that reflects consensus on intended impact
  • Choose indicators that will yield useful information for program development
  • Compile and use evaluation results for staff learning and reflection
  • Build evaluation teams within organizations
  • Share program progress and impact information with board and funders

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Embracing Our Clients’ Healthy Strivings: A View From Self Psychology
Date:   Friday, June 23, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Denise Davis

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

“Blow on the ember”, was the advice of self psychologist Marian Tolpin, a protégé of Heinz Kohut, the father of self psychology. This captures the understanding that despite our clients’ pain or behavioral symptoms, a healthy spark is embedded in their suffering and in even the most maladaptive behaviors. Self psychology informs clinicians in their efforts to seek out clients’ healthy strivings and facilitate transformation.

Participants will learn the basics of contemporary self psychological theory, including the influences of intersubjectivity theory and attachment theory on self psychology. The presenter will bring the theory to life through her use of a wide variety of clinical examples.

Based on participation in this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define “self” and “selfobject” according to self psychology
  • List requisite developmental experiences in the formation of a healthy self
  • Explain the function of transference within a self psychology framework
  • Describe the therapeutic action (i.e. what causes change) within self psychology
  • Respond to selfobject transferences to promote clients’ growth
  • Assess clients’ from a self psychological perspective
  • Conceptualize psychopathology from a self psychological viewpoint
  • Demonstrate the empathic listening mode with clients
  • Apply a self psychological understanding of resistance and defenses to client work
  • Recite Frank Lachmann’s 3 principles of salience in attachment and clinical work
  • Utilize an understanding of intersubjectivity theory to enhance client interaction

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The Ethics of Caregiving in an Increasingly Complex Health System
Date:   Friday, June 23, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Gary Gilles

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Approximately one in three families in the U.S. cares for an aging, disabled or chronically ill family member. The percentage of families caring for a loved one is expected to increase dramatically over the next decade due to many anticipated changes in our healthcare system and federal entitlement programs. The ethics surrounding caregiving challenges some of our deepest beliefs about family, the sanctity of life, dignity of personhood, and death. This workshop takes a close look at some of the most important ethical issues related to caregiving from the perspective of family members and professionals caring for these individuals. Special emphasis will be made to apply the discussion of ethical concerns in the workshop to practical caregiving topics through case studies and personal exploration of participant’s values. 

Course objectives:

  • Explore common assumptions and challenges associated with caregiving
  • Discuss the shifting financial concerns around caregiving
  • Examine the importance of self-identifying as a caregiver
  • Differentiate between the healthcare culture and the family culture
  • Discuss ways an individual’s worth is measured in the healthcare system
  • Examine the role of social care in caregiving
  • Evaluate the intersection between caregiving and end-of-life issues

This workshop satisfies the state of Illinois ethics requirement for clinical psychologists and social workers.

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Engendering Inclusion: Providing Affirming Services to Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults
Date:   Thursday, June 29, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Aren Drehobl

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Transgender and gender nonconforming people have existed throughout history.  In recent years, however, dramatically increased visibility and growing social acceptance have led more transgender people than ever to openly discuss their identities, experiences, and needs.  Even clinicians with extensive experience working with gender diversity have difficulty keeping up with rapidly evolving terminology, thinking about best practices, and available resources.  This workshop will cover these topics and others to help participants provide truly affirming services to transgender and gender nonconforming adults.

The workshop format will include a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and clinical consultation to help participants increase both their knowledge and their concrete skills in providing gender-affirming care. 

Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Comfortably use inclusive terminology and gender neutral language
  • Identify common presenting issues and contemporary practice models
  • Assess and improve the level of gender-inclusivity of their current practice

This workshop satisfies the state of Illinois cultural competence requirement for social workers.

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Substance Abuse Treatment in the FQHC: Managing the Opioid Crisis
Date:   Friday, June 30, 2017
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75    
CEUs: 3
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Amanda Brooks

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Integrating mental health services into primary care clinics improves patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and patient outcomes, and decreases health care costs. Placing mental health and substance abuse (MH/SA) professionals on the front lines of primary care alongside physicians to deliver consultative MH/SA healthcare allows for a shift toward a population-based approach, and thus increases access to more individuals. 

However, lack of timely access to addiction professionals, specifically DATA Waiver physicians who can prescribe buprenorphine, significantly impacts engagement in addiction treatment. 

From 2007-2012, the state of Illinois decreased its treatment capacity for alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) treatment by 52%, making it the number one treatment capacity decline in the United States. In 2004, more than 1.2 million Illinois residents suffered from an AODA disorder, and approximately 266,000 individuals were managing co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. With the expansion of access to affordable healthcare that includes substance abuse treatment as an essential health benefit, community health centers are faced with the daunting responsibility of expanding comprehensive medical and behavioral health services to include the treatment of AODA disorders.  The complicated risk factors associated with the opiate dependent patient create both organizational and provider challenges to offering expanded access to care. 

Learning Objectives:

Through this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the history of events resulting in the culmination of the opioid epidemic. They will also better understand the correlations between behavioral health and substance use, and the integration of substance abuse treatment into the primary care setting. The workshop will outline the essential components of State and Federal regulations needed to navigate implementation and integration of opioid treatment into primary care. It will also explore ways to enhance integrated services with the inclusion of medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence in order to provide better care for vulnerable populations. Finally, the presenter will review best practices in integrating substance abuse services into the established behavioral health and primary care model.

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Becoming an Anti-Racist Social Worker
Date:   Monday, July 10 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructors: Brit Holmberg & Marion Malcome

Registration Deadline: Wednesday July 5, 2017

Despite advances in race relations the past several decades, institutional racism continues to impact both access to and the quality of services provided to people of color. One needs to look no further than the criminal justice system in which African-American men are currently more likely to be incarcerated than to graduate from college. Ongoing institutional racism also contributes to disparities in mental health, education, employment, poverty rates.

Since social workers and other mental health professionals work with clients and communities of color across multiple systems, it is critical to have the language and analysis to build cross-cultural relationships and challenge institutional racism and racial oppression. This interactive workshop provides relevant strategies for becoming an effective anti-racist social worker at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Specifically, human service providers working to dismantle racism need to:

1. Develop a historical perspective of US race relations
2. Acquire and deepen the language of race
3. Understand and analyze the current impact of racism
4. Increase individual skills for practice
5. Work for transformation at the agency and community levels

This interactive workshop describes institutional racism in the 21st Century and provides strategies for becoming an effective anti-racist social worker at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. It is ideal for a practitioner who is either interested in beginning to incorporate anti-racist principles into his/her work, or who has begun the process but is interested in additional interventions and further reflection.

The workshop satisfies the state of Illinois cultural competence requirement for social workers.

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Facilitating Effective Meetings
Date:   Monday, July 10 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Arnie Aronoff

Registration Deadline: Wednesday July 5, 2017

Do you lead or attend meetings that seem to go nowhere?  Have you been frustrated by the lack of consensus or decision making in your work group? This one-day workshop will teach you the best ways to facilitate meetings in which you must share information, come to consensus on action steps, and move ahead. 

Topics include:

  • Setting agendas;
  • Ways of generating ideas;
  • Methods for reaching consensus;
  • Structuring open discussions using techniques such as tracking and sequencing;
  • Dealing with interpersonal dynamics that impair progress, such as domineering participants;
  • Keeping a group focused and on-topic;
  • Minimizing repetition and “wheel-spinning;”
  • Using formal meeting rules such as Robert’s Rules and the Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure.

Please Note: The instructor will use experiential activities, brief lectures, and simulations to facilitate learning.

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The Ikuo Yamaguchi Memorial Seminar
Authoring a Life:  Narrative Identity, Redemption, and Donald J. Trump
Date:   Wednesday, July 12 2017
Time: 5:00pm-6:30pm
Tuition: Free   
CEUs: 1.5
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Presenter: Dan P. McAdams

Registration Deadline: Wednesday July 5, 2017

Beginning in late adolescence and young adulthood, many people create broad stories for their lives to explain how they have come to be the persons they are becoming. Through authoring a narrative identity, a person reconstructs the past and imagines the future in such a way as to provide his or her life with a sense of temporal continuity, coherence, and purpose.

Narrative identities come in many different forms and variations, but one especially powerful prototype in American society is what I call the redemptive self. In its idealized form, the redemptive self tells the story of a gifted protagonist who journeys forth into a dangerous world and who, equipped with deep conviction and moral steadfastness, transforms suffering into enhancement, aiming ultimately to leave a positive legacy of the self for future generations. Americans seem to love redemptive life stories, cultural variations of which include narratives of religious atonement, upward social mobility, personal emancipation, and recovery. 

Contemporary psychological research shows that, in the midlife years, crafting a narrative identity that more or less resembles the redemptive self tends to be associated with psychological well-being and with leading a productive and caring life. Redemptive life narratives, therefore, serve as valuable psychological resources for countless American adults today. Indeed, until quite recently, men (and women) who aspired to become President of the United States typically aimed to project strongly redemptive life stories, as was especially the case for Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. But then Mr. Trump came along. It is not even clear that President Trump has developed a coherent narrative identity of any kind, to make sense of his life in time. And to the extent he has, the story departs wildly from the cherished American form.

This program is made possible by the Ikuo Yamaguchi Memorial Seminar Fund

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Effective Therapy for Bereavement, Grief, and Loss in Adults
Date:   Friday, July 14, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Janna Henning

Registration Deadline: Wednesday July 5, 2017

Loss experiences, including changes in a relationship or career, leaving a home or community, or illness, death, and bereavement, are among the most common issues our clients may bring to therapy. In addition, situations clients are currently facing may often trigger feelings or reactions about previous, unresolved losses. Although these issues will frequently arise in any type of clinical setting, recent changes in grief-related theory and diagnosis and a lack of formal training in this area may leave therapists feeling insufficiently prepared to work effectively with the unique, multi-faceted, and personal nature of each client’s loss.

This workshop will focus on increasing knowledge and awareness of key issues and approaches in the grief and bereavement field, and help practitioners develop new, practical, individualized, and creative skills to help identify clients’ loss-related needs and assist them to adjust and thrive. The instructor will utilize interactive discussions, case studies, media and Internet resource guides, and hands-on demonstration. Participants will gain the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to work confidently and effectively withnormal and complicated grief in their work with clients.

Course Exit Competencies:

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Identify ways in which loss-related issues may impact adult therapy clients from a biopsychosocial-spiritual perspective.
  • Differentiate between normal grieving and mental illness.
  • Describe effective, research-supported, culturally competent approaches to assisting clients in adjusting and thriving after loss.
  • Apply and utilize several narrative-focused and therapeutic interventions as part of an integrative treatment plan.
  • Begin to recognize and manage the therapist’s personal beliefs and countertranseference reactions elicited by loss and death-related themes.

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DSM-5: Significant Changes Impacting Practice
Date:   Monday, July 17, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructors: Stan G. McCracken & Susan McCracken

Registration Deadline: Wednesday July 12, 2017

Publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders contained some major changes in diagnostic criteria and in the way some conditions were classified (e.g., splitting current Mood Disorders and Anxiety Disorders clusters). Furthermore, the new edition included the most significant conceptual changes since release of the third edition in 1980, and the decade-long revision process has not been without controversy.

This one-day workshop will review some of the more significant conceptual and criteria changes proposed for children, adolescents, and adults. A partial list of topics include: the increased emphasis on the dimensional element in diagnosis and classification; the use of diagnostic spectra and clustering in DSM-5; and changes to specific diagnoses and diagnostic clusters. It is designed for practitioners who are experienced in using the DSM, not for preparing for the licensing exam or interested in training on psychopharmacology.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will know about the increased emphasis on the dimensional element in diagnosis and classification
  • Participants will know about the increased emphasis on assessment in DSM-5
  • Participants will know about the use of diagnostic spectra and clustering in DSM-5
  • Participants will know about the increased emphasis on developmental perspectives in DSM-5
  • Participants will know about changes to some specific diagnoses and diagnostic clusters in DSM-5

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Ethics and Cultural Diversity
Date:   Thursday, July 20, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Mark Sanders

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 12, 2017

This skill-building workshop focuses on ethics as they pertain to effectively servicing a diverse client base and creating an organization that meets the needs of all employees and clients regardless of differences.

Topics covered in this workshop include:

  • Ethics in cross-cultural counseling
  • Ethics in Group and Family Therapy
  • Strategies for incorporating aspects of culture into the change process
  • Intersectionality and microaggressions
  • Ways to create an inclusive organization that meets the needs of employees and clients

By the end of this workshop participants will increase awareness about:

  • Ethical considerations in cross-cultural counseling
  • How to move beyond first impressions when working with clients from diverse backgrounds
  • The ethics and steps involved in creating an inclusive organization
  • Seven strategies for incorporating aspects of culture into the change process
  • How to address ethics and diversity in family therapy
  • How to address ethics and diversity in group therapy.

This workshop satisfies the state of Illinois cultural competence requirement for social workers, and the ethics requirement for clinical psychologists and social workers.

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Delivering Trauma-Informed Care
Date:   Friday, July 21, 2017
Time: 9:00am-12:00pm
Tuition: $75    
CEUs: 3
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Lauren Feldman

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Traumatic life events can have an intense physical, psychological and spiritual impact on the way we live our lives. Untreated trauma has the power to transform our personal narratives and the way we see our communities. That is why it is essential for clinicians to practice through a trauma-informed lens in any setting.

In this training, participants will develop language and tools to deliver trauma-informed care. We will also discuss the way that hope and resiliency can be its own intervention in helping clients heal from trauma. In the second part of this training, we will shift our focus to the impact of trauma work on the clinician. We will also consider new methods of self-care aimed specifically at lifting vicarious trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  • To become familiar with different types of traumatic life events and how to intervene in each category.
  • To learn the three pillars of trauma-informed practice (establishing safety, setting safe boundaries, and creating consolidation).
  • To utilize a client’s risk factors and protective factors as interventions in trauma-informed care.
  • To consider hope and resiliency as interventions in the treatment of trauma.
  • To become familiar with somatic empathy and its relationship to vicarious trauma.
  • To adopt new practices around self-care.

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Juvenile Law for Mental Health Professionals
Date:   Friday, July 21, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuition: $150  
CEUs: 6
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Helene Snyder

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Illinois juvenile law regarding child maltreatment is a complex composite of statutes, court decisions, and administrative regulations. A case may be initiated in the Juvenile Court, Domestic Relations Court, or in a DCFS administrative proceeding. Or, more than one case may be simultaneously initiated judicially and administratively. 

This workshop will analyze the processes by which cases are referred to courts and to administrative proceedings, and review the outcomes that may result from such referrals.               

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Motivational Interviewing: Skills for Navigating the Change Process
Dates: Wednesday, July 26 -Friday, July 28, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4:00pm (each day)
Tuition: $425  
CEUs: 18
Location: 969 E 60th Street, Chicago

Instructor: Nick Turner

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported way of being with clients in an empathic, open, nonjudgmental, and collaborative manner. The clinician practicing MI helps those with whom they are working acknowledge and explore ambivalence in regards to behavior change. Furthermore, once a client decides to make (or not make) changes, the MI clinician collaborates in determining a course of action. MI, though simple at first glance, is complex and requires ongoing training and practice. 

Through this intensive skills-based training, participants will gain knowledge and skills related to the entire process of MI (engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning) and person-centered clinical practice.

Learning objectives:

  • Identify what MI is and what it isn’t
  • Learn about person centered clinical practice
  • Gain skills related to guiding clients through the behavior change process
  • Learn about next steps for ongoing training and skill acquisition

Credits for CADC-licensed professionals applied through the Illinois Certification Board.

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Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.