Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.

Bridging the Couple Chasm: Gottman Couples Therapy Level 1 Training
Friday, February 26 & Friday, 27, 2016
9:00am-5:00pm (both days)
Hyde Park
Tuition: $430*
CEUs: 14

Registration Deadline: Monday, February 15, 2016

Instructor: Michael McNulty

This two-day workshop is an intensive overview of The Gottman Method, an evidenced-based approach to couples therapy. Participants will learn to identify key points in couples’ interactions when interventions will be most effective; strategies to help partners shift from attack to connection; methods to help couples solve their own problems; skills to empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues; and tools to support couples’ friendship and intimacy.
 
Upon conclusion of this workshop, participants will learn:
 
• How couples really sustain their marriages–in contrast to common myths and misconceptions
• How the quality of relationships affects the immune system, physical health and well-being
• How marital problems change over time, but never go away–even in happy couples
• Proven strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict
• Skills that empower partners to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues
• Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts
• Techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse 
 
CEUs will be provided by SSA. Certificates for completing Level I will be awarded through The Gottman Relationship Institute. 
*Tuition includes the Gottman Level 1 manual

Register Online

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The 2016 Ikuo Yamaguchi Memorial Seminar: Personal Finance and The Helping Professions
Wednesday, March 2, 2016
6:00-8:00pm
Hyde Park

Registration Deadline: Monday, February 29, 2016


Free for no CEUs
$10 for 1.5 CEUs*
*Free for SSA students, alumni, faculty, and staff

Personal financial management is a serious challenge that faces millions of Americans across the income spectrum in every walk of life. Professor Harold Pollack is co-author of The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated. Inspired by an index card composed by Pollack containing personal finance advice that went viral online, Pollack proposes that all the information people need to know about managing their money fits onto a 4x6 index card.

In this seminar, the speaker will describe some of his experiences writing the book and discuss the rules he tells readers to make the most of their retirement investments; how to pay down credit card, student loan, or other debt; and how to find a financial advisor that puts their interests first.

While the goal of the book is to give readers basic resources to assist in the tasks associated with personal financial management, it also provides important lessons for those in the helping professions—most notably the human social services sector. Our clients have many concrete difficulties that bring them to social service assistance or intervention. Many or most of these clients also face financial challenges—managing debt, budgeting, bill payments, credit cards, etc. As social service professionals, we must develop better resources and skills to assist people to address these challenges, whose resolution dramatically affect their clinical outcomes and long-term well-being.

At the conclusion of this Seminar attendees will have an increased understanding of:

  • The burdens placed on most Americans posed by the shift towards 401(k) and other defined contribution tax-advantaged savings vehicles as the major pillar of American retirement and college savings policies
  • Market failures by which most Americans are encouraged by financial media and financial professionals to embark on investment strategies that dramatically under-perform simple market indices (regulatory efforts to require financial professionals who offer retirement advice to commit to a fiduciary standard)
  • Behavioral-Economic obstacles to proper saving and investing, with examples from disability policies designed to assist parents of individuals with special needs
  • Promising policy and direct-practice interventions to assist individuals to make better choices regarding investment and debt—and the inherent constraints on any policy approach which seeks to ameliorate these problems through improved individual decision-making and behavior

About the Ikuo Yamaguchi Memorial Fund

The Ikuo Yamaguchi Memorial Fund was established in 2000 in memory of Ikuo Yamaguchi, AM’60.  Mr. Yamaguchi (1927 – 1993) was one of the first Japanese students to attend SSA after World War II.  Born in Tokyo, he graduated from the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies in 1947.

Receiving a stipend from the Salvation Army during his studies at SSA, Mr. Yamaguchi was required to work for the Salvation Army upon graduation for two years.  This began what would be a 30 year career with the agency as a family therapist.  He later rose to the position of executive director of the Family Service Division.

Recognizing Mr. Yamaguchi’s strong belief in social workers’ continuous professional learning and growth, the annual Ikuo Yamaguchi Seminar was created by his wife Mari, friends and relatives of Ikuo and Mari from the U.S. and Japan, in tribute to celebrate his life.

Register for seminar, book signing, and reception (Free)

Register for seminar, book signing, reception, and 1.5 CEUs ($10)


Spanish for Social Workers: Intermediate or Advanced
Wednesdays: March 2, 9, 16, 30; April 6, 13, 20, 27
5:30-8:00pm (each date) 
Hyde Park
Tuition: $325
CEUs: 20

Registration Deadline*:  Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Instructors: Faculty from National Autonomous University of Mexico in Chicago

These courses are intended for individuals who have previous knowledge of the Spanish language and wish to develop their linguistic and cultural abilities to better communicate with Spanish speakers within the context of social work practice. The courses include Spanish language and culture components to provide opportunities for using Spanish in real-life context. Both courses satisfy the State of Illinois cultural competence CE requirement for social workers.
 
*A written test and phone interview prior to the registration deadline are required to ensure appropriate placement in either the Intermediate or Advanced level course.
 
These courses are designed to help participants:
 
• Apply newly acquired language skills in their practice
• Practice conversational Spanish through role-plays
• Write reflections and class assignments in Spanish using proper vocabulary and grammar

Intermediate

This course is intended for participants who have taken one or two courses of Spanish in high school or college. The class will review basic structures (present indicative) and moves toward narrating and describing in the past tense through more elaborate interactions between social workers and clients. Activities will include: role play, simulations, small group practice for vocabulary and grammar, written reflections, and assigned readings for class discussion.
 
Advanced
 
This level is recommended for participants with a pre- to intermediate proficiency in Spanish (a minimum of three courses of Spanish in high school or college) who can narrate and describe events in the past, both orally and in writing; and for those who have learned past tenses but are a little bit rusty. The class will begin with a review of past tenses and move toward the use of subjunctive forms and commands through more advanced interactions in the social work setting.

Register Online - Intermediate

Register Online - Advanced

Download a Registration Form


Social Work License: Preparation Review Course
Friday, March 11 & Saturday, March 12, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm (each date)
Hyde Park
Tuition: $250
CEUs: 12

This workshop has reached capacity . To be added to the waitlist please email pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Instructor: Sophia F. Dziegielewski 

Beginning July 1, 2015, the social work licensing exams provided by The Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB)  included DSM-5™ content. This comprehensive course will provide materials updated for DSM-5™ content, cover test-taking strategies, and relevant clinical content in order to prepare for the social worker or clinical social worker exams. This course satisfies the State of Illinois Ethics CE requirement for social workers. 
 
Course objectives: 
  • Overview of test construction and test-taking strategies 
  • Identify how to break down questions and identify key words 
  • Practice how to take social work practice information and address it in a standardized format
  • Social work values and ethics 
  • Recite and synthesize the dynamics of abuse and neglect
  • Review and interpret the NASW Code of Ethics
  • Human growth and development issues
  • Summarize major theoretical approaches to understanding human development with individuals, groups, and families
  • Sketch the theories and stages of normal psychosocial, cognitive, moral, and behavioral development in the life cycle of individuals, families and groups
  • Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies
  • Identify and interpret psychosocial history and collateral data, and how it relates in the social work practice setting
  • Assess client problems along with behavioral/psychosocial strengths and weaknesses
  • Identify diagnosis, assessment and practice intervention utilizing the DSM-5
  • Define the components of intervention strategies with individuals, groups, families and communities
  • Identify factors in the therapeutic relationship that facilitate building and retaining relationships
  • Models and methods of social work practice
  • Recognize the major theoretical approaches, models and methods of practice in the social work profession
  • Cite the different types of research designs utilized in social work practice
  • Translate the most common policies and procedures that govern service delivery
  • Clinical supervision
  • Restate the roles and functions related to professional supervision and educational expectations
This course consistently fills to capacity. Early registration is encouraged.  
*Tuition includes a review course manual with sample test questions and related materials, as well as the opportunity to contact the instructor with questions following the course.

Register Online

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 Engendering Inclusion: Providing Affirming Services to Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults
Friday, March 18, 2016 
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

This workshop has reached capacity . To be added to the waitlist please email pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Instructor: Aren Drehobl 

Transgender and gender nonconforming people have existed throughout history.  In recent years, however, dramatically increased visibility and growing social acceptance have led more transgender people than ever to openly discuss their identities, experiences, and needs.  Even clinicians with extensive experience working with gender diversity have difficulty keeping up with rapidly evolving terminology, thinking about best practices, and available resources.  This workshop will cover these topics and others to help participants provide truly affirming services to transgender and gender nonconforming adults.
 
The workshop format will include a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and clinical consultation to help participants increase both their knowledge and their concrete skills in providing gender-affirming care. This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois cultural competence CE requirement for social workers.  
 
Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:
 
• Comfortably use inclusive terminology and gender neutral language
• Identify common presenting issues and contemporary practice models
• Assess and improve the level of gender-inclusivity of their current practice

Register Online

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Ethics, Aging, and Society: Identifying and Analyzing Dilemmas
Friday, April 1, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6 

This workshop has reached capacity . To be added to the waitlist please email pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Instructor: Martha Holstein

What are the ethical implications of being old in an ageist society? What to do at the end of life; how to address elder abuse and neglect; what if one doesn’t age “successfully,” or finds oneself in a nursing home where care questions are frequent; or how to negotiate that familiar struggle between safety and autonomy and, what about the contemporary policy environment which leaves large holes in care, especially around care provision?  These concerns suggest the broad scope of issues that this workshop will address.  Moreover, it will explore traditional and more recent approaches to examining ethical dilemmas in the clinic, at the bedside, in congregate living sites, and in the community while also exploring the ethical implications of the “new aging,” with its emphasis on being “not old,” and the ways in which policy and gender shape our opportunities when we are old.   

At the close of this workshop, participants will:

  • Deepen their understanding of the broad scope of ethics and aging 
  • Understand the contextual features that influence their own thinking about ethics and shape their ability to satisfactorily address ethical problems encountered in their work 
  • Understand the practical and the ethical implications of public policies, cultural norms and societal values 
  • Be able to apply both traditional approaches to analyzing ethical dilemmas and more contemporary approaches such as narrative and feminist ethics 
  • Enlarge understanding of how gender, through the application of a feminist lens, shapes both experiences of late life and the moral problems that result

Register Online

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Clinical Supervision: Tending the Professional Self
Friday, April 8, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Evanston
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Instructor: Jill R. Gardner

Professionals often advance to supervisory roles with little or no formal training in ways to conceptualize the supervisory process. In this workshop, we will approach clinical supervision as an activity focusing on the development, consolidation, and maintenance of the supervisee’s professional self. Emphasis will be on supervision as a relationship and on the importance of focusing on the inner experience of the trainee. Concepts from self psychology and other theoretical perspectives will be used to describe models of supervision.
 
Through a combination of lecture and large-group and small-group discussion, we will address how to do the following: manage supervisees’ anxiety and self-esteem, deal with defensiveness, balance administrative and clinical demands, integrate empathy with limit setting, and engage in effective feedback. Participants will be encouraged to share and examine their current supervisory experiences in the context of the conceptual frameworks presented. 
 
This workshop will emphasize work with students and recent graduates; however, participants will find much of the conceptual material applicable to supervisory relationships with employees as well. The workshop is appropriate for both new and experienced supervisors. Please Note: This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois clinical supervision CE requirement for clinical professional counselors. 
 
This workshop is designed to help supervisors be able to:
 
• Create a collaborative supervisory alliance and structure
• Reduce anxiety and defensiveness in the supervisee
• Identify internal processes that lead to problematic clinical interventions
• Provide effective feedback
• Balance administrative and clinical demands
• Set appropriate limits while maintaining a positive supervisory relationship

Register Online

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Manager as Coach: Conversing with, Motivating, and Developing Employees in the Nonprofit Sector
Friday, April 8, 2016 - This workshop has reached capacity and a second date has been added:
Friday, April 15, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

This workshop has reached capacity . To be added to the waitlist please email pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Instructor: Arnie Aronoff

Effective managers are also coaches. They offer employees both positive and developmental feedback on how they perform existing and future duties. They provide this feedback in both informal and formal conversation. They are aware of what motivates – and “de-motivates” - members of their organization. With an eye to the future, they help their employees think about career aspirations. They work with employees to identify and develop specific skills, talents, credentials, and abilities that employees can use now or later in their careers.
 
In this experiential workshop, participants will practice conducting meaningful learning conversations with direct and indirect reports. They will also discuss challenges and strategies in motivating employees who work in nonprofit organizations - organizations usually not positioned to provide significant financial reward for superior performance. 
 
Participants will also learn how to work with employees to identify skills sets or abilities needed for their existing jobs or for future positions inside or outside their organizations. Finally, we will discuss how formal training, “assignments in place,” and strategic planning can help employees practice and develop skills for future use. 
 
Learning Objectives
 
By the end of this one-day workshop, participants should be able to:
 
• Initiate and manage a dialogue about a performance challenge related to skill or motivation
• Know when to stop coaching an employee who either is unwilling or unable to change, and what to do under these circumstances 
• Delegate effectively so that an employee is challenged and stimulated in his/her work 
• Create a realistic plan for supervising high performers that includes both opportunities and limitations for growth in the organization

Register Online

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Family Law for Mental Health Professionals
Friday, April 15, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Instructor: Helene Snyder

As a result of the legislative amendments that took effect January 1, 2016, significant changes in Illinois domestic relations and parentage laws will affect all aspects of the parent-child relationship.  Not only have fundamental elements of this relationship been redefined by the new laws, but the terminology used to express basic legal concepts pertaining to the parent-child relationship has changed.  
 
This workshop will focus on Illinois family law for mental health professionals who work with parents and children confronting the legal issues associated with what was previously referred to as child custody and visitation and is now an allocation of parental responsibility and parenting time, as well as parentage and relocation.  Understanding the revised rules of the legal system and the core legal rights and duties of family members under the new laws will aid mental health professionals in assisting parents and children who are currently, or potentially, involved in court cases.  

Register Online

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Male Roles in Family, Community and Civil Society
Friday, April 15, 2016
9:00am-Noon
Hyde Park
Tuition: $75
CEUs: 3 

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Instructor: Waldo Johnson

The workshop presentation draws on various social science disciplines including family studies, anthropology, political science, history, human development, sociology, psychology, economics, demography and professions including social work, public policy, law, public health and medicine.
 
The workshop presentation will examine definitions of family and an overview of family structures, community and civil society, followed by a human development examination of male social roles within these contexts and how boyhood, adolescent and adult male social roles are affected by family structure, socio-economic status, historical and cultural family origins, citizenship status, and individual/family engagement within the broader society.  The succeeding component of the workshop examines male social roles within neighborhood and community contexts and how boyhood, adolescent and adult male social roles external to the family are influenced by engagement within these contexts.  The final component of the course examines civic engagement and societal male social roles assumed by boys, adolescent and adult males.
 
By the end of this workshop presentation, participants will be able to:
  • Recognize a range of historical, contemporary and emerging male social roles assumed and navigated during boyhood, adolescence and adulthood within families, neighborhood and/or communities and civil engagement within American society
  • Recognize how social statuses, both real and socially constructed, such as socioeconomic, nativity, citizenship, race and ethnicity, gender, religious and sexual identities, and geographic location have historically have place these social contextual experiences within a broader life course; developmental framework that enable males as boys, adolescents and adults to link youth, adolescent and subsequent adult experiences to their physical and psychological development that shape assumption of social roles within families, neighborhood/community and civic society
  • Examine professional and societal interventions that mitigate environment and social conditions experienced by boys, adolescent and adult males in their assumption of various social roles and shape current and subsequent social role assumption in family and community

Register Online

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DSM-5: Significant Changes Impacting Practice
Friday, April 29, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Northbrook
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6 

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Instructors: Stanley G. McCracken and Susan McCracken

This workshop will review the conceptual and criteria changes in DSM-5 for children, adolescents, and adults. It is designed for practitioners who are experienced in using the earlier edition of the manual. A partial list of topics include: the increased emphasis on the dimensional element in diagnosis and classification; the use of diagnostic spectra and clustering in DSM-5; and changes to specific diagnoses and diagnostic clusters.

Register Online

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Embracing Our Clients’ Healthy Strivings: A View From Self Psychology
Friday, April 29, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Northbrook
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Instructor: Denise Davis

“Blow on the ember”, was the advice of self psychologist Marian Tolpin, a protégé of Heinz Kohut, the father of self psychology. This captures the understanding that despite our clients’ pain or behavioral symptoms, a healthy spark is embedded in their suffering and in even the most maladaptive behaviors. Self psychology informs clinicians in their efforts to seek out clients’ healthy strivings and facilitate transformation.

Participants will learn the basics of contemporary self psychological theory, including the influences of intersubjectivity theory and attachment theory on self psychology. The presenter will bring the theory to life through her use of a wide variety of clinical examples. 
 
Learning Objectives:
 
Based on participation in this workshop, participants will be able to: 
  • Define “self” and “selfobject” according to self psychology 
  • List requisite developmental experiences in the formation of a healthy self 
  • Explain the function of transference within a self psychology framework 
  • Describe the therapeutic action (i.e. what causes change) within self psychology 
  • Respond to selfobject transferences to promote clients’ growth 
  • Assess clients’ from a self psychological perspective 
  • Conceptualize psychopathology from a self psychological viewpoint 
  • Demonstrate the empathic listening mode with clients 
  • Apply a self psychological understanding of resistance and defenses to client work 
  • Recite Frank Lachmann’s 3 principles of salience in attachment and clinical work 
  • Utilize an understanding of intersubjectivity theory to enhance client interaction

Register Online

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Donald W. Winnicott and Contemporary Psychotherapy
Friday, May 6, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Downtown Chicago
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

This workshop has reached capacity. Please email pdp@ssa.uchicago.edu to be added to a waitlist.

Instructor: William Borden

Donald W. Winnicott has emerged as one of the most creative thinkers in the psychoanalytic tradition, and his developmental theories and clinical perspectives continue to deepen our appreciation of essential concerns in contemporary psychotherapy. This workshop provides an introduction to Winnicott’s thought and shows how his contributions enlarge our understanding of problems in living and concepts of therapeutic action in clinical practice. 
 
Winnicott elaborated complex and compelling accounts of human development and therapeutic action, over the course of his career as a pediatrician and psychoanalyst, but he did not codify his ideas in a systematic, integrative fashion. He wrote in a personal idiom that is often characterized as poetic and evocative, what Andre Green calls “a richly alive experiencing,” and critics see him as elusive and iconoclastic in his refusal to define his fundamental concepts in a more technical language and rigorous manner. Even the most experienced readers of Winnicott struggle in their attempts to grasp the defining features and central themes of his theoretical and clinical writings.   
 
By way of overview, the first part of the workshop examines the fundamental elements of his developmental psychology, identifying core concepts and orienting perspectives. It presents basic developmental formulations, drawing on representative passages from Winnicott’s writings, and shows how his deep faith in our capacity for change, growth, and health informs ways of approaching the therapeutic situation.  We outline points of connection with recent developments in the science of mind and Buddhist psychology.  
 
The second section, focused on clinical practice, introduces concepts of therapeutic action based on Winnicott’s formulations of development and psychopathology. We see how core concepts shape approaches to assessment, establishment of the holding environment, use of relational experience, and interpretive process over the course of psychotherapy.    
 
Discussion of clinical practice centers on vulnerable clients who present particular needs in psychosocial intervention, encompassing a range of diagnostic categories, and emphasizes flexible and pragmatic use of therapeutic strategies in view of the particular clinical situation—creative efforts to carry out what Winnicott called “experiments in adapting to need.”   
 
Learning Objectives:
 
• Introduce the core concepts of Winnicott’s developmental psychology and outline the orienting perspectives and essential concerns that shape his conceptions of growth, health, and well-being across the life course 
• Describe how Winnicott’s developmental formulations can deepen our understanding of facilitating processes and therapeutic action in psychosocial intervention 
• Show points of connection with neuroscience and mindfulness practices in Buddhist psychology 

Register Online

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Program Evaluation: Getting What You Need
Friday, May 6, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Downtown Chicago
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Instructor: Debra Hass

This workshop will examine evaluation from the perspective of organization staff and board members. Participants will practice creating theories of change and choosing indicators that reflect the intended impact of their programs, respond to stakeholder concerns, and, most importantly, provide opportunities to learn from and use evaluation for program improvement. 
 
Participants will learn to:
 
• Identify the appropriate type and intensity of evaluation for a given program
• Create a theory of change that reflects consensus on intended impact
• Choose indicators that will yield useful information for program development
• Compile and use evaluation results for staff learning and reflection
• Build evaluation teams within organizations
• Share program progress and impact information with board and funders

Register Online

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From Principles to Processes, Resistance to Dissonance: Profound Revisions to Motivational Interviewing
Friday, May 20, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Instructors: Rebecca Canelos and Chris Link 

This intermediate-level workshop will highlight the profound changes recently introduced to motivational interviewing (MI). Attendees will gain exposure to modifications to the very spirit of MI and the four new basic processes, which form the flow of any session. Other topics introduced include change and sustain talk and discordance in the therapeutic relationship versus resistance in the client. Emphasis will be on skill acquisition and practical application. This workshop is appropriate for practitioners in substance abuse, mental health, health care, employee assistance programs, and senior services settings.
 
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will:
 
• Be able to state why the spirit of collaboration, acceptance, compassion, and evocation is important in the practice of MI
• Understand the four new basic processes: engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning
• Incorporate the preexisting core MI skills: Open ended questions, Affirmations, Reflections and Summaries (OARS) within the four new basic processes
• Gain exposure to the concepts of change and sustain talk and learn how to use them as indicators to guide a client through an MI session
• Learn the significance of switching from Rolling with Resistance to Dancing with Discord
 
Please Note: Continuing education credits for psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists provided by SSA. Credits for CADC-licensed professionals applied through the Illinois Certification Board.

Register Online

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It Takes A Village: Supporting Families of Children, Adolescents , and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 20, 2016
9:00am-4:00pm
Hyde Park
Tuition: $150
CEUs: 6

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Instructors: Kathy Gould and Laura Wald

This workshop examines the impact on families of having a child, teen, or adult member diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Extended family and sibling relationships will be examined, as well as information on the most current studies that address genetic and environmental issues, the rise in diagnosis, and financial costs associated with having a family member with a diagnosis of ASD.  Participants will learn how to access treatment services from the beginning phases of diagnosis through adulthood and how to identify resources for therapies, with a focus on evidence-based practice. Participants will learn strategies for working collaboratively with families of diverse backgrounds, helping them manage issues of grief, loss, and stress, and empowering families to support family health and quality of life. This workshop satisfies the State of Illinois cultural competence CE requirement for social workers.

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Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a program should contact the PDP office at least one week in advance of the event for assistance.

Andrea Haidar, AB '15, AM '16

Andrea Haidar, AB '15, AM '16

"The David and Mary Winton Green Scholarship has allowed me to pursue my ambitions in social work research and administrative practice. I feel well prepared and excited to advance my career in the social services."